Linda M. Penn - Resources for Learning
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Resources for Learning



Below is a sample of the resource materials Linda Penn has created to go with her books. Resource materials that are available on Linda's books can be found below this sample as .pdf files for download.

Dear Parents and Teachers:
 
Per Kentucky Department of Education Standards, here are Social Studies, Science,
Writing, and Math connections to use with my books.There are Reading
discussion questions located at the back of each book.
 
Hope you and your children enjoy reading and using this book! I would love to hear
from you and the children with comments about the book and suggested connections,
or any questions about writing.
 
God bless,
 
Linda M. Penn
 

RESOURCES

 
NO MORE FRENCH FRIES IN THE BED




READING QUESTIONS  To be used with No More French Fries in the Bed   Before the reading:  
  1. Have you ever gone to a summer camp?  If so, how did you feel about being away from home overnight? 
  1. Have you or anyone in your family received a trophy or a special award?  Explain your feelings. 
  During the reading:  
  1. Why was Samantha so excited about her trophies?  Which one seemed to be the most important to her?  Why do you think this? 
  1. What do you think Samantha thought Allyson would do while she was away at camp?  Find a sentence in the story to support your opinion. 
  1. Explain your ideas about why Samantha did not tattle to her mom and dad about Allyson’s messiness? 
  1. Samantha decided to apologize to Allyson.  Did the Most Cooperative Trophy influence her decision?  Why or why not? 
  1. What was the final agreement Allyson and Samantha made about their room? 
  After the reading: 
 
  1. Does this story remind you of anything that has happened to you? 
  1. Do you have any rules about other people in your room?  If so, how are your rules the same and different from Samantha and Allyson’s rules? 
   Copyright 2014 Linda M. Penn All Rights Reserved  




TEACHING RESOURCES  To be used with No More French Fries in the Bed    WRITING:  
  1. Create a story about Samantha and Allyson where Allyson is the one who goes to camp. 
  1. Recount an experience where you and someone had a disagreement, then came to a compromise. 
    SOCIAL STUDIES:  
  1. List the rules you would have at your camp about clean cabins. 
  1. What examples of good citizenship would you look for in giving a “Most Cooperative Camper” award at your camp? 
  
 
 
SCIENCE, MATH, TECHNOLOGY 
 
     You will be going to camp for five days.  You leave in two days.  Using newspapers and/or Internet, research the weather forecast for the days you will be at camp.  Based on this forecast, list what clothes you will need to take with you.  Example:  shorts or long pants, etc. 
 
Will you be taking any rain gear?  Why or why not? 
 
 
Copyright 2014 Linda M. Penn All Rights Reserved 
 
 
 
Teaching resources based on Common Core Standards 2012 
 




THE AVENUE

TEACHING RESOURCES
FOR GRADES PRE-K, K, 1, 2



By Linda M. Penn

BEFORE THE READING OF THE AVENUE:

Have a Bible open to Genesis 1.  Read or tell the story of how God made the world from Genesis 1: 1-28.
A)  Discussion with child:   What did God make?  (everything – light, darkness, day, night, water, sky, land, plants, sun, moon, animals living in water, animals living on land, birds, people.
B)  Who did God make to be in charge of His world?  (people)
C)  Pick a favorite thing that God made.  How would your life be different if God had not created that thing?  Say a thank you prayer to God for creating this favorite thing.

READING OF THE AVENUE:
Before the reading:

Look at the front and back covers.  What do you think will be in this story?
Briefly scan through the pictures in the book.  Are your thoughts about what will happen in the story the same or different now?
What do you think an “avenue” is?  (road)
Does this book make you think of any place you have ever been?

During the reading:
Why do you think she wants to walk to The Avenue on this day?
What things does she see on her walk? 
What made her think of Jesus?
How does she show that she is helping to take care of God’s world?

After the reading:

Name some ways that you can help take care of God’s world.
Draw and color about God’s world.

COPYRIGHT 2015 LINDA M. PENN ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
www.lindampenn.com
lindampenn@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Linda-M-Penn-Author/202527643213378



THE AVENUE

TEACHING RESOURCES
FOR GRADES 3 – 5



By Linda M. Penn

BEFORE THE READING OF THE AVENUE:

Read Bible verses – John 14: 1-6 about the pathway to real life through Jesus.
For discussion –
What is God preparing for us?  (rooms in Father’s house)
 How do we get to that place?  (Jesus is the way, believe in Him)
Imagine what this place might look like.

READING OF THE AVENUE:

Before the reading:

Briefly scan the pictures and guess what happens in the story.
What do you know about the little girl just from looking at the pictures?
Do the pictures make you think of any place you have ever been or imagined?

During the reading:

Why do you think the little girl thought of Jesus during her walk?
How do you think she is feeling after her walk?  Why do you think this?

After the reading:

Compare your ideas about Heaven to this little girl’s wishes.  How same and different?
As she grows and matures, will her ideas and wishes change?  How? 
As you grow and mature, how do you think your ideas and wishes will change? 
Who will be there to guide you?

COPYRIGHT 2015 LINDA M. PENN ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
www.lindampenn.com
lindampenn@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Linda-M-Penn-Author/202527643213378


THE AVENUE

TEACHING RESOURCES
FOR YOUTH


By Linda M. Penn

BEFORE THE READING OF THE AVENUE:

Read Bible verses Matthew 7: 1-5, about not judging others, and being a hypocrite.  Discuss the meaning of “hypocrite.”
Why does Jesus say not to judge others?
What should we take out of our own eyes?
What do you think Jesus meant by a “speck” and “log” in our eyes?
What are some ways that we see others being judged?
Are people’s perceptions of others always true?
Do you think you have any misguided perceptions of others?
Have you grown up with any misguided perceptions that have changed over the years?  For the better or worse?

READING OF THE AVENUE:

As you read the story, look for any misguided perceptions or stereotypical passages.

1)  What are the mother’s perceptions of the “big house people?”
How do her perceptions affect the little girl?
Do you think her attitudes will change as she matures?  If so, how?
How do you address rich vs. poor, or any other stereotypical types of behavior by others about you without being confrontational?
Why did the little girl go home singing about Jesus?
WHO LOVES US NO MATTER WHAT OTHERS THINK?  (JESUS)
After reading the book:

1)  When you saw this book and realized you were going to read it, what was your first impression? 
2) Did you think it was a “kid’s” book and therefore too below your level?  Was this a misguided perception?
3) What did you find useful from reading this “kid’s” book?  The next time you are asked to read a “kid’s” book, will you have a preconceived opinion before you read it or will you look for a learning opportunity?

COPYRIGHT 2015 LINDA M. PENN ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
www.lindampenn.com
lindampenn@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Linda-M-Penn-Author/202527643213378




THE AVENUE

TEACHING RESOURCES
FOR ADULTS


By Linda M. Penn

BEFORE THE READING OF THE AVENUE:

Read Bible verses Luke 10: 25 – 37, Good Samaritan parable, Who is my “neighbor?”
From the parable, which one of the travelers was the “neighbor?”
Why did the other travelers pass the injured man?  What were their preconceived ideas about the injured man?  Where might they have gotten these ideas?
What did Jesus say the man who asked about who is his neighbor should do?
 Based on this parable, who is our “neighbor?”  What does Jesus expect of us regarding our “neighbor?”

READING OF THE AVENUE:

Scan through the pictures.  What do you think might be in this story?
What do you think you know about the little girl?
 After reading through the story, how do your preconceived ideas compare to what you found out in the story.  Were they true or false?
In the story, what did the mother assume about the “big house” people?  Do we know for sure if Mom’s opinions were true or false?
 Reread the page with the picture of the little girl sitting on the bridge.  Why do you think the little girl is having trouble understanding why Mom told her not to go past the bridge and not to bother the “big house” people?
What is your opinion of how Mom handled the “rich/poor” issue with the little girl?
Do you think the little girl will grow up and have the same opinion of “rich/poor” as Mom?  Why or why not?

FOR DISCUSSION AFTER THE READING OF THE AVENUE:
1)  Do you think your preconceived attitudes toward others are based on your childhood experiences?   How have your attitudes changed over the years?
    2)  If you are parents, grandparents, or teachers of young children or teens, what kind of impression are you making on them about stereotypes?  Are you following Jesus’ words  and example about loving your “neighbor?”

COPYRIGHT 2015 LINDA M. PENN ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
www.lindampenn.com
lindampenn@gmail.com
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Linda-M-Penn-Author/202527643213378






Clayton's River Adventure RESOURCES

CLAYTON’S RIVER ADVENTURE READING QUESTIONS


Before the reading:
 
1)    Have you ever been on a boat or would you like to ride on a boat?
2)    Recall a favorite event you shared with a grandparent or older relative and what you learned from that person.
 
During the reading:
 
1)    Why do you think Grampy, Mom, and Dad kept the Granny Rose a secret?
2)    Explain Grampy’s decision to name the new boat the Granny Rose.
3)    State the reasons that Clayton and Austin suspected Grampy was playing a joke on them.
4)    List at least two facts about the Ohio River that you found particularly interesting.  Why were these facts interesting?
5)    Name at least five things that Clayton and Austin saw on their river adventure.  Rank which one you think the boys found the most exciting.  Why do you think this?  Find some sentences in the book to support your answers.
 
After the reading:
 
1)    Does this story remind you of anything you have ever experienced?
2)    Evaluate Clayton and Austin’s behavior on this trip.  Were they responsible deckhands?  Find some sentences in the book to support your answers.
 




WRITING, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
 
 
1)    Using printed materials and the Internet, research about water pollution along the Ohio River or any major waterway in your area.  Compose letters to the mayors of major citiies along the waterway about the research findings.  Plan a volunteer clean-up.
 
2)    Devise a plan to educate people, particularly boaters, about the hazards of water
pollution.  Present your findings to the mayors.
 
 
 
MATH, SOCIAL STUDIES, TECHNOLOGY
 
      1)  Using printed materials and the Internet, research about the locks along the Ohio
      River.  If it takes two days to travel between Cincinnati and Louisville and it takes   
      an average of 30 minutes to go through a lock chamber, estimate how long it
      would take to travel between Pittsburgh and Cairo, Illinois. 
 
2)    Present your findings to your parents along with your recommendation about
whether or not to travel by houseboat all or part of the way from Pittsburgh to Cairo.
 
3)    Using the “Fast Facts about the Ohio River,” located in the back of the book,
chart the history of the river.  Share and explain your chart to a younger class at your school.
 







Clayton's Birding Adventure



SOCIAL STUDIES
for use with Clayton’s Birding Adventures

The City Council is considering a request from a local business owner to buy 5 acres of
the 15 acre Eagles Park. The business will employ 20 people.

Using the information from “Clayton’s Birding Adventures” and any other print or digital sources, analyze the pros and cons of this request. Plan a 3 minute presentation at the next City Council meeting stating why they should or should not allow this purchase.

(Per KY Program of Studies 2006, Social Studies Standards - Government and Civics)
SCIENCE
for use with Clayton’s Birding Adventures

1) Using “Clayton’s Birding Adventures,” and any other print or digital sources, design a poster showing the needs of birds and how they are dependent on other earth
materials for their survival.

2) Your neighbor is setting up a bird feeder for the first time. Drawing from the
information in this book and any other print or digital sources, give your neighbor at
least 4 suggestions.

(Per Next Generation Science Standards 2013 - Interdependence of Relationships in
Ecosystems)

READING
for use with Clayton’s Birding Adventures

Before the Reading
1) From viewing the illustration on the cover and browsing the inside of the book, what
might be the main idea in this story? Predict what will happen.

2) State some experiences you have had with birds. Explain if they were enjoyable or
not so enjoyable adventures. Describe the most unusual bird you have seen.

During the Reading
1) Why do you think Clayton is so excited about the birds in his backyard? Find a
sentence in the story to prove your answer.

2) Explain the relationship between Clayton and Austin. What might be a reason they
became friends so quickly?

3) How does the trip to the pet store develop into an adventure for Clayton and his
mother? Give at least 3 reasons.

4) At the ending of the story, it is revealed that Mr. Todd is Austin’s grandfather. Was
this a surprise to you, like it was to Clayton? Why or why not?

After the Reading
1) Compare your predictions about the book to what actually happened in the book.
How were they similar and different?

2) Using the charts and Fast Facts about Birds page, tell about 3 of the things
concerning birds that you found most interesting.

3) Do you think you will be more aware of the birds in your own environment in the
future? Why or why not?

4) Which character in the book do you think contributed the most to Clayton’s
enjoyment of birds? Explain.

(Per Common Core State Standards 2012 - Reading for Literature K-5 and Reading for
Informational Text K-5)

WRITING
for use with Clayton’s Birding Adventures

1) What is your opinion of the book? Give specific story examples to support your
opinion.

2) In this story, Clayton plans to do research on parrots. Reviewing the pictures and
information in the book, which bird would you like to learn more about? Why?

3) Using real or imaginary characters, develop a new story in which the main character
encounters a problem with birds.

4) Using the glossary of this book, explain in your own words the difference between
molting and preening.

5) Using print or digital sources, research about the birds in any state of your choice,
taking notes. Summarize the information for an oral or written report. Provide list of
your sources.

(Per Common Core State Standards 2012 - Writing K-5)

MATH
for use with Clayton’s Birding Adventures

See the “Birds I Saw This Week” page in the book.

(Per Common Core State Standards 2012, Math K-5 - Representing and Interpreting
Data)





Hunter and the Fast Car Trophy Race  



SOCIAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS
for use with Hunter and the Fast Car Trophy Race  

A) Students role play various workers needed to operate a racetrack.

B) Using a ball of yarn, create an “interdependence web,” whereby the students give a reason why they are dependent on each other’s jobs.

SCIENCE CONNECTIONS
for use with Hunter and the Fast Car Trophy Race 

A) Students build different style ramps and use toy cars to predict and investigate how forces (pushing and pulling) affect motion.

B) Students determine which kind of ramp caused the cars to have the slowest to fastest motion down the ramp. 

MATH CONNECTIONS
for use with Hunter and the Fast Car Trophy Race

A) Using data gained in the Science study (above) , graph the slowest to fastest ramps.

B) Using data from newspapers and the Internet, graph slowest to fastest qualifying speeds for a race.   

RESEARCH AND WRITING CONNECTIONS
for use with Hunter and the Fast Car Trophy Race

A) Using the Internet and books, research and write about the different types of race cars:  stock cars, open wheel cars.

B) Using the Internet and books, research and write about safety equipment used by race teams.   


Is Kentucky in the Sky?



SOCIAL STUDIES CONNECTIONS
for use with Is Kentucky in the Sky?
 
Grades Pre-K, K. 1:
 
A) On an outline map of the United States, locate Kentucky and Oklahoma. Draw a
line from Kentucky to Oklahoma. What other states are between Kentucky and
Oklahoma?
 
B) Find your home state (or any other state) on the U.S. map and draw a line from that
state to Oklahoma. What other states are between your state and Oklahoma?
 
C) Use a globe to find the United States.
 
Grades 2, 3:
 
A) Using an outline and a physical map of the United States, describe what land
features Grandpa may have seen from his airplane window. Why do you think this?
 
B) What land features would you see from an airplane window if you were headed to
Oklahoma from your home state (or any other state)? Why do you think this?
 
C) Using a globe and the maps, find Kentucky, Oklahoma, and your state. Tell how the
globe and maps are the same and different.
 
 
SCIENCE CONNECTIONS
for use with Is Kentucky in the Sky?
 
Grades Pre-K, K, 1, 2, 3:
 
A) Using a weather map from today’s newspaper, TV, Internet, etc., predict what kind of
weather it will be in Kentucky, Oklahoma, and your home state (or any other state).
What makes you think this?
 
B) Using this information, what kind of clothes might Grandpa need for his trip?
 
Grades 2, 3:
 
A) Using the weather map from above, fill in a blank bar graph showing the order for the
high temperatures today in Kentucky, Oklahoma, and two other states.
 
B) Using the information from above, predict if Grandpa will have any flight delays due
to weather problems? What makes you think this?
 
 
MATH CONNECTIONS
for use with Is Kentucky in the Sky?
 
Grades Pre-K, K, 1, 2, 3
 
A) Using the outline map of the United States from the Social Studies Connection, find
your home state (or the other state you picked). Do you think it would take you a
longer or shorter time to DRIVE to Oklahoma than Allyson’s trip would take?
 
B) Check your answer by using a ruler to measure each line you had drawn on your
map. Was your answer correct?
 
Grades 2, 3:
 
A) Using the physical map of the United States from the Social Studies Connection,
find the mileage scale and calculate mileage from Kentucky to Oklahoma.
 
B) Use the kilometer scale and calculate kilometers from Kentucky to Oklahoma.
 
 
WRITING CONNECTIONS
for use with Is Kentucky in the Sky?
 
Grades Pre-K, K, 1, 2, 3:
 
A)   Draw or write about your favorite part of this story.
 
B)   Draw or write about a problem Grandpa might have during his visit to Oklahoma.
 
C) Draw or write about if you would rather drive or fly to Oklahoma. Tell or write about why.